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168 item(s) matching your criteria; sorted by type.
Behind "North County" by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
A discussion of the case of Lori Benson, who was the inspiration for the movie North County.
E.J. Graff: Too Pretty A Picture 01-30-2007
North Country could have given audiences an eye-opening portrayal of the brutal reality of sexual harrassment. Instead, the film takes the easy way out.
E.J. Graff: The Family Values Sideshow 01-30-2007
Coming to your state soon: a campaign to deprive lesbian and gay couples of rights in the guise of "marriage protection."
Scott McLemee on "The Chosen" 01-30-2007
Jerome Karabel's book about Ivy League admissions touches a bundle of raw nerves. Scott McLemee of Inside Higher Ed twitches in response.
Sex and Politics: How the Press Gets It Backwards by E. J. Graff, 01-30-2007
EJ Graff asks when is investigation into a public person's sexual behavior simply sensational voyeurism and when is it genuine matter of public interest.
James Traub on "The Chosen" 01-30-2007
Slate writer James Traub writes, "Thanks to Jerome Karabel, author of The Chosen, I know now a great deal more about the circumstances surrounding my admission to Harvard in 1972 than I ever wanted to know."
Malcolm Gladwell on "The Chosen" 01-30-2007
In his New Yorker review of Jerome Karabel's The Chosen: The Hidden History of Admission and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, Malcolm Gladwell discusses how social pressures and class prejudice led to strange definitions of "merit" in American universities.
Affirmative Action for Income Inequities by Jerome Karabel, 01-30-2007
Troy Duster Profiled in New York Times by Troy Duster, 01-30-2007
Troy Duster, a Longview Institute Senior Fellow, urges geneticists to slow down and check their methods as they search for links between genes, disease and race in the October 18th edition of the New York Times.
Is Marriage Dead? by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
Never Say 'Never Again' by E. J. Graff, 01-30-2007
By reporting on the stubborn human heart's peculiar movements during major world events, Heda Kovaly’s 'Under A Cruel Star' explains what could happen the next time around.
Women's Vote Is an Elusive Force by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
What Women Really Want : How American Women Are Quietly Erasing Political, Racial, Class, and Religious Lines to Change the Way We Live
Author: Celinda Lake & Kellyanne Conway with Catherine Whitney
Publisher: Free Press
Pages: 336 pp
Price: $26.00
The Compassion Gap in American Poverty Policy 01-30-2007
Hurricane Katrina suddenly revealed the face of poverty in our midst. But why was that such a surprise? This analysis explains why the poor repeatedly disappear from sight and why our current policies towards the poor are both ineffective and inconsistent with our moral values.
It Wasn't So Easy for Roosevelt, Either 01-30-2007
An excerpt from Jerome Karabel's upcoming book, The Chosen: The Hidden History of Admission and Exclusion at Harvard, Yale, and Princeton, which will be published by Houghton Mifflin in October 2005. For more on the book, including the first chapter, see the book's website.
Get Hitched, Young Woman by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
Ruth Rosen responds to the latest efforts by conservative ideologues to change the subject in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.
How to Deal with a National Disgrace 01-30-2007
Ruth Rosen argues for responding to the disaster of Hurricane Katrina with a revived commitment to common effort and true compassion.
Toxic Terror by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
How one community fought for the human right to breathe clean air.
Sen. Barack Obama: "What is Your Place in History?" 01-30-2007
Arlie Hochschild, Longview Advisory Board Member: "The Chauffeur's Dilemma." 01-30-2007
Bill Moyers: "This is Your Story" 01-30-2007
The Missing Piece: Health Care and the Faith Community by Donald Light, 01-30-2007
Retirement Security: A Moral Economy Proposal by Fred Block, 01-30-2007
Fred Block applies the Moral Economy perspective to the debate about Social Security and other retirement programs. He proposes an alternative revenue source that would allow us to protect both present and future generations of retirees from economic hardship and insecurity.
Retirement Security: A Moral Economy Proposal 01-30-2007
Fred Block applies the Moral Economy perspective to the debate about Social Security and other retirement programs. He proposes an alternative revenue source that would allow us to protect both present and future generations of retirees from economic hardship and insecurity.
Carole Joffe: The Right's Bitter Pill 01-30-2007
In this piece, Carole Joffe discusses one of the most unusual new fronts in the neverending abortion war--the growing instances of "pro-life" pharmacists who refuse to fill women's birth control prescriptions. Similar to other pieces on the Longview website, Joffe argues here that the reproductive rights movement, while supporting legal abortions, also works to prevent unwanted pregnancies; in contrast, many of those opposed to abortion also promote policies that virtually assure there will be more unwanted pregnancies, and thus, more abortions. Given the near universality of contraceptive use by American women, and especially the high rate of use of birth control pills, and the high rate of approval of contraceptive use by Americans generally, Joffe sees this movement of pharmacists' refusal as a classic case of "overreaching" by the Religious Right that may well backfire.
Welcome to the Longview Institute 01-30-2007
Longview is a new institute started by seven of the eight founding fellows of the Rockridge Institute. We created Longview because we believe it will allow us to make more rapid progress on the work that we began at Rockridge. We are deeply grateful to all of the individuals and organizations that have provided past financial support and hope that we will enjoy your continued involvement.
Old Women in the Cold by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
Talking About Public Health: Developing America's "Second Language" by Lawrence Wallack, Regina Lawrence, 01-30-2007

The mission of public health—improving the health of populations—is difficult to advance in public discourse because a language to express the values animating that mission has not been adequately developed. Following on the work of Robert Bellah, Dan Beauchamp, and others, we argue that the first “language” of American culture is individualism.

A second American language of community—rooted in egalitarianism, humanitarianism, and human interconnection—serves as the first language of public health. These values resonate with many Americans but are not easily articulated. Consequently, reductionist, individualistic understandings of public health problems prevail.

Advancing the public health approach to the nation’s health challenges requires invigorating America’s second language by recognizing the human interconnection underlying the core social justice values of public health.

Our Founding Mothers by Ruth Rosen, 01-30-2007
Bush's Defunct Economist by Fred Block, 01-30-2007
The case for privatizing Social Security depends on an error of logic. If in the future, there are too few wage earners to support too many retirees, private accounts will not solve the problem.
Framing: More Than A Message by Lawrence Wallack, 01-30-2007

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